BMW fixes security flaw to stop hackers opening doors of 2.2 million BMWs

0
0

0
0
0

In a move that shows just how vulnerable cars have become, BMW says it has found a solution to a security flaw that could have allowed hackers to open doors of 2.2 million BMWs, Mini and Rolls-Royce vehicles

The vulnerable cars had the ConnectedDrive software, which uses on-board SIM cards, to identify owners. A German motorist association, ADAC, took note of the security vulnerability and alerted BMW, according the news service in a report from Frankfurt, Germany. But the report also says that officials aren’t aware that hackers ever exploited the security flaw.

Affected were mostly BMWs with ConnectedDrive, the Rolls-Royce Phantom and Mini hatchaback. The cars were made between March, 2010, and last December, according to ADAC. Once inside the car, hackers could have potentially put other systems at risk as well.

Fears have been raised recently that hackers could not only break into cars, but access other systems controlled by computers  including engine, steering, brakes and others.

Update via USB.

You can perform this software update yourself. To do so, all you need is a standard USB memory stick with sufficient memory capacity. If required, your BMW Dealer will also have a USB memory stick for you to purchase. To perform this software update, you will require the USB audio interface (included in optional equipment codes 6FL, 6NH, 6NK, 6NL, 6NS or 6NR) as well as the Control Display and iDrive. Your vehicle can be updated provided that you have the ‘Software update’ option on your ‘Settings’ menu in the Control Display.